Noortje Kessels | De interventie van cyberpoëtica: Een analyse van Verhelsts roman Zwerm en Andrews’ digitale “Spas Text”

21.1 Cyberpoetics

Abstract

This article examines the intervening qualities of Peter Verhelst’s novel Zwerm and Jim Andrews’ digital text “Spas Text.” ‘Intervention’ is a relatively new concept which is mainly applicable to digital literature. In this article, intervention is linked to Deleuze & Guattari’s concepts of ‘territorializing’ and ‘deterritorializing.’ Comparing Zwerm to “Spas Text,” a digital text that changes when the reader moves his/her mouse over it, this article shows how these fragmentary texts relate to each other and to the theory of intervention.

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June 16th, 2014

Samuel Vriezen | Totale verbinding: Flarf en de mogelijkheid van disruptie in een futloze wereld

21.1 Cyberpoetics

Flarf is a recent form of American experimental poetry. It takes collages of Internet search results as a starting point to create texts constructed out of banalities. In its procedures Flarf seems to be an heir of Dada, but it can also be interpreted within a American poetic tradition of democratic representation that starts with Whitman and runs through Language Poetry. The different poetics result in diverse strategies – disruptive or connective – to determine the character of the surface of the text. Flarf, as subversive poetry, poses the question as to what possibilities for disruptions are feasible within the connective medium par excellence: the Internet.

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June 16th, 2014

Kiene Brillenburg Wurth | Intermediality and Postmediality in Contemporary Cyberpoetry

21.1 Cyberpoetics

Abstract

In this article Brillenburg Wurth asks whether cyberpoetry is a rediscovery of modernistic experiments, a post- or multi-medial phenomenon. According to Inter mediality, Postmediality in Cyberpoetr y – 51 Brillenburg Wurth, cyberpoetry addresses differences between media, problematises them and does not commit to a single genre. She illustrates this with a specific kind of cyberpoetry that consists of multiple media that merge and transform into each other, or as Brillenburg Wurth calls it: “medially complex digital poetry.” Amongst others, Brillenburg Wurth uses the work of Jason Nelson and Jim Andrews to support her argument.

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June 16th, 2014

N. Katherine Hayles | Distributed Cognition at/in Work Strickland, Lawson Jaramillo, and Ryan’s slippingglimpse

21.1 Cyberpoetics

Abstract

Slippingglimpse exemplifies how distributed cognition is being imagined and instantiated in contemporary electronic literature. The structure enacts a threefold recursive cycle between human and non-human cognizers in which the water ‘reads’ the poem text, the videography ‘reads’ the water, and the poem text ‘reads’ image capture technology. The work raises profound questions about the nature of ‘reading’ in the digital age, the collaborations possible between human and non-human agents, and the significance of the recursive loops that connect humans to the environment.

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June 16th, 2014