Bram Ieven | Machine, poëzie en kapitaal: Een involutie op het werk van Félix Guattari

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

This article analyzes Félix Guattari’s concept of the (abstract) machine and its implications for the relation between literature and capitalism. Guattari’s work develops an alternative concept of the machine that endeavors to think a transversal nterrelation between heterogeneous elements. At the same time, the machinic processes that Guattari sees everywhere can operate as restraining forces. In many respects this is the case for capitalism, Guattari argues. His later work deals at length with searching for new ways in which a creative use of media and the arts can counter such restraining forces by creating new and heterogeneous connections. Focusing on poetry in specific, this article outlines Guattari’s ideas in relation to literature. The article confronts Guattari’s work with Frans-Willem Korsten’s recent work on the relation between poetry and capitalism. Korsten argues that poetry and capitalism share a similar operative principle, but that this principle is effectuated in different ways in poetry and capitalism. Korsten’s theory accounts for the ineffectiveness of poetic critique on capitalism, and at the same time works toward an alternative mode of poetic critique.

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October 5th, 2014

Elisabeth Ladenson | Proust, Self-Censorship and the Representation of Homosexuality

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

This essay arose out of the observation that while censorship is, for obvious reasons, most often studied in terms of works actually censored, it has always worked most consistently and most effectively through self-censorship. Taking Marcel Proust’s groundbreaking depiction of homosexuality in his Sodome et Gomorrhe — a work that was never censored — as an example, the essay attempts both to contextualize it within the burgeoning representation of male homosexuality in early 20th-century fiction and to demonstrate the ways in which Proust felt that he was less free to depict male friendship than his early 19th-century predecessor Balzac.

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October 5th, 2014

Francesca Billiani | Aesthetic Censorship? Readers’ Reports from Fascist Italy

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

This article discusses the complex and ambivalent nature of book censorship of translations in Italy during the fascist period, from the point of view of the publishing industry. By not understanding censorship as a merely top-down phenomenon and by adopting Michel Foucault’s notion of Panopticism, it assesses the extent to which readers’ demands and aesthetic preferences from ‘below’ could influence the censor’s final decision on what to publish. To this end, this article draws on unpublished primary material, such as the readers’ reports of the day, held in the archive of the biggest publishing house of the day, the Milanese Arnoldo Mondadori.

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October 5th, 2014

Andrew Hadfield | Censorship in Renaissance England: The Fate of Edmund Spenser

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

Using the example of Edmund Spenser, a writer who was frequently in danger of having his work censored, this article argues that analysis of Elizabethan censorship in recent times has often been misdirected. Scholars have argued about the behaviour of the authorities and whether what they decided to allow into print was reasonable. As a study of Spenser’s work indicates there may well have been a desire to censor more texts more heavily, but there was no apparatus available to enforce such a policy. Only when texts drew attention to themselves, often when causing a particular incident, was the punitive mechanism of the law employed.

04. Andrew Hadfield – Censorship in Renaissance Engalnd, The Fate of Edmund Spenser (main)

October 5th, 2014

Nicholas J. Karolides | Suppression of Thought: Political Bans and Societal Constraints

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

Political and societal insecurities are the bases of most censorship activities, each representing suppression of freedom of expression. Governments — from military dictatorships to democracies — are concerned with security, corruption charges, and embarrassing revelations. And when a society’s moral norms seem to be challenged in literary works, officials and citizens may reject the texts to protect the “innocent.” With regard to political banning, the presumed assumptions about censorial governments and the reality of censorship by nations on both sides of the political divide are examined and illustrated. The societal segment acknowledges the longevity and nature of literary obscenity and the evolving jurisprudence, significantly clarifying the definition of obscenity, supporting the freedoms of expression.

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October 5th, 2014

Antoon De Baets | Power, Freedom and the Censorship of History

21.2 Censuur

Abstract

This essay analyzes the relationship between power, freedom, and history. It concentrates on the theoretical problems generated by the censorship of history and the justifications and effects of that censorship in contemporary political settings (dictatorship, post-conflict society, and democracy). In order to define the censorship of history, borderline areas and demarcations with closely related concepts are surveyed. The presence of censorship in different modes, genres, fields, categories, eras, and countries is briefly discussed. The final analysis addresses the relationship between censorship and epistemology, historical awareness and ethics.

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October 5th, 2014