Frame Frame

Exposition: Further Reading

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Recent Publications Barla, Josef The Techno-Apparatus of Bodily Production A New Materialist Theory of Technology and the Body Columbia UP, 2019 ISBN: 978-3-8376-4744-0 What if the terms “technology” and “the body” did not refer to distinct phenomena interacting in one way or another? What if we understood their relationship as far more intimate—technologies as always already embodied, material bodies as always already technologized? What would it mean, then, to understand the relationship between technology and the body as a relation of indeterminacy? Expanding on the concept of the apparatus of bodily production in the work of Donna Haraway and Karen Barad, Josef Barla explores how material bodies along with their boundaries, properties, and mean- ings performatively materialize at sites where technological, biological, technoscientific, (bio-)political, and economic forces intra-act. Fidmer-Oraiz, Natalie Homeland Maternity: US Security Culture and the New Reproductive Regime U of Illinois P, 2019 ISBN: 978-0-252-08414-0 In US security culture, motherhood is a site of intense contestation both a powerful form of cultural currency and a target of unprecedented assault. Linked by an atmosphere of crisis and perceived vulnerability, motherhood and nation have become intimately entwined, dangerously positioning national security as reliant on the control of women’s bodies. Drawing on feminist scholarship and critical studies of security culture, Natalie Fixmer-Oraiz explores homeland maternity by calling our attention to the ways that authorities see both nonreproductive and “overly” reproductive women’s bodies as threats to social norms and thus to security. Homeland maternity culture intensifies motherhood’s requirements and works to discipline those who refuse to adhere. Analyzing the opt-out revolution,...

Anneloek Scholten & Max Casey | “The Singular Falls Continually”: Queer Bodies out of Time in Nightwood

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Abstract This article argues that Djuna Barnes’ Nightwood (1936), despite partly subscribing to a Freudian model of homosexuality based on inversion, simultaneously demonstrates a concept of sexuality and identity that gestures outwards. Nightwood’s characters display excesses of meaning and are located outside of—rather than arrested in—linear heteronormative time. The novel’s sexual and identarian incoherencies create a sense of temporal dislocation and, in Barnes’ dense stylistics, characters that verge on linguistic illegibility. This article analyses the dynamics of (sexual) identity in the novel, and in doing so, attempts to highlight the potentialities of Nightwood for contemporary feminist and queer...

Laureanne Willems | Take Up Space/Know Your Place: On the Relationship Between Anorexia and Feminism

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Abstract This paper takes Emma Woolf’s memoir An Apple a Day as a case study to look at the relationship between feminism and anorexia. Reading the memoir in this context lays bare the ways in which the feminist model fails to understand Woolf’s lived illness experience. Through looking at Woolf’s personal aetiology theory, the stigma around anorexia and mental illness, contemporary gender roles and beauty ideals, and conceptualisations of health and illness, it becomes clear that anorexia cannot be understood in a single interpretational framework. In her memoir, Woolf is speaking back to larger narratives about anorexia.* *The author explores the lived experience of anorexia in more detail in her MA thesis, which was awarded the UU Best Master’s Thesis Award...

Christina Crosby | Words Matter: Friendship, Grief, and Maggie Nelson’s Reckoning with Loss

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Abstract In this essay, I explore how my friendship with the writer Maggie Nelson helped to sustain me in the two years immediately following a catastrophic accident that paralyzed me. In the years since, she has continued to help me reckon with profound loss, as her writing assures me that it is possible to represent both what has been lost and what remains. Odd as it may seem, of her many books, Jane: A Murder is the greatest comfort to me in its stark confrontation with irreparable loss and ongoing grief. Jane was her mother’s sister, killed before Maggie was...

Timothy C. Baker | Fear and Pity, Pity and Fear: Rereading Muriel Spark’s The Driver’s Seat in the Age of #MeToo

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Abstract Muriel Spark’s The Driver’s Seat (1970) is often approached simply as a narrative puzzle. Examining it in relation to #MeToo rhetoric and recent work by feminist scholars including Kate Manne and Linda Martín Alcoff, as well as examining its unacknowledged inspiration from giallo films, provides an opportunity to reconsider Spark’s complicated portrayal of agency and bodily experience, especially as it is perceived in the classroom. Spark’s novel questions the possibility of writing female bodies in an age, and a form, that is dominated by misogynistic representations, and how the reception of such novels is often determined by cultural...

Emma Bond & Eleanor Crabtree | From Snap to Selfcare: Reading Feminism through Sara Ahmed and Phoebe Boswell

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How can we bring two feminist bodies of work that operate through different media into meaningful conversation with one another? Using Fournier’s framework of autotheory, we work through this question by reading Sara Ahmed’s critical theory and Phoebe Boswell’s creative practice connectively, tracing intersectional feminist pedagogies and key concepts common to both as we go. Instead of applying critical theory to creative practices, we use creative practices as a tool to better understand how theory can be in ‘touch’ with the world. Co-writing this article is an initial step in seeking out the creative and embodied aspects of our own practice as feminist...

Eva-Lynn Jagoe | Delusional Girl: Genre and the Representation of Feminized and Feminist Subjectivity

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Abstract This essay compares the feminized subjectivity and agency that is represented in Lena Dunham’s 2014 coming-of-age memoir, Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She’s ‘Learned’, to the more complex depictions found in the dramatic comedy of her fictional show, Girls. In its production of a self who progresses towards self-knowledge, the memoir is inextricably shaped by the fantasies of neoliberal feminist individualism. In Girls, on the other hand, Dunham represents the contradictions of this kind of subject formation, thus exposing the frictions of contemporary liberal...