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Exposition 31.2 Fact and Fiction

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As you may have noticed, this issue of FRAME did not include the usual exposition, listing recent books connected to our theme. This was because this issue is so full of amazing articles, we had to cut a few pages! However, we did compile a lovely exposition, and it would be a shame not to share it, so here it is... d’Ancona, Matthew Post-Truth: The New War on Truth and How to Fight Back Ebury Press, 2017 ISBN 978-1-7850-3687-3 Welcome to the Post-Truth era—a time in which the art of the lie is shaking the very foundations of democracy and the world as we know it. The Brexit vote, Donald Trump’s victory, the rejection of climate change science, the vilification of immigrants, all have been based on the power to evoke feelings and not facts. So what does it all mean and how can we champion truth in a time of lies and “alternative facts”? In this eye-opening and timely book, Post-Truth is distinguished from a long tradition of political lies, exaggeration, and spin. What is new is not the mendacity of politicians but the public’s response to it and the ability of new technologies and social media to manipulate, polarize, and entrench opinion. Where trust has evaporated, conspiracy theories thrive, the authority of the media wilt, and emotions matter more than facts. Now, one of the UK’s most respected political journalists, Matthew d’Ancona, investigates how we got here, why quiet resignation is not an option and how we can and must fight back. Fuller,...

Art and the Anthropocene — Anthropocene Week at the Minerva Art Academy Groningen

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by Lauren Hoogen Stoevenbeld and Clara Vlessing On 17th February the Minerva Art Academy, an art school in Groningen, exhibited the results of a week’s work around the theme of the Anthropocene. Following our own issue “Perspectives on the Anthropocene” in Winter 2016, Frame’s interest was piqued. Having explored academic discussions surrounding the Anthropocene, we were curious as to how it could be represented artistically. Would the Anthropocene mean the same thing or have the similar associations for artists? What new elements or perspectives could their art bring to the debates surrounding the Anthropocene? How could the Anthropocene be artistically represented? Keen to find answers to some of these questions we headed to Groningen to talk to the students and teachers of the Minerva Art Academy. We were greeted by José de Lange, the exhibition’s organiser, who explained the week’s structure to us. The week had taken the form of a series of lectures and workshops, after which the students worked on projects in groups under the guidance of a project supervisor. It took only a brief conversation with De Lange to reveal her fascination with the Anthropocene. She argued that we, the human race, are at turning point in terms of our relationship with the planet: we can either keep doing what we’ve always done or start looking for new solutions. In many ways, the Minerva Art Academy’s project was a process of acknowledging the problem and looking for such solutions. “The Anthropocene,” said De Lange, “is inside all...